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Eating Up Food Politics


Our country is growing. Not just in population; we’re talking menu size, portion size, and waist size. What’s an American to do? Marion Nestle, NYU prof and author of several books including Food Politics: How the Food Industry Influences Nutrition and Health, believes our society is in the midst of a food revolution where we have the chance to tackle this growing problem.

On Thursday, February 26, at 7:30 p.m., Nestle will visit Santa Barbara to give a talk about how to deal with the present “eat more” outlook. Nestle is adamant that something needs to be done about the food environment that encourages our society to eat more frequently than it needs to, more often than it should, and in more places than there used to be.

In this particular talk, Food Politics: Personal Responsibility vs. Social Responsibility, Nestle will focus on advocating changing the current food system into one that is better for both producers and eaters. This event, sponsored by the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center at UCSB, is part of the yearlong Food Matters program, and takes place at the Marjorie Luke Theatre (721 E. Cota St.). Tickets are $5, but students are free.

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