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Whole Foods Adopts Animal Welfare Rating System

Global Animal Partnership Supplies Ratings for Chicken, Pork, Beef


Given 97,000 chickens a minute are slaughtered for food worldwide, it’s easy to wonder if our fowl might end up foul. And that’s just chickens. According to the United Nations, around the world, more than 60 billion land animals are raised for meat annually. There are people keeping track of what’s going on, and that’s where Global Animal Partnership (globalanimalpartnership.org) and its independent auditors step in, rating the treatment of animals for food on a 1-5 scale. Even better, Whole Foods has now teamed up with Global Animal Partnership, so all the chicken, pork, and beef at Whole Foods comes with a five-step animal welfare rating, and all Whole Foods products get to at least step 1, which, simply put, means no crates, no cages, no crowding. “With an overarching goal to continuously improve the lives of farm animals, Global Animal Partnership’s 5- Step Animal Welfare Rating system is one of the single-most impactful programs we have implemented to date at Whole Foods Market,” said A.C. Gallo, president and COO for Whole Foods, in a press release. “We are proud to adopt this new rating system that helps shoppers make even more informed buying decisions while offering them peace of mind that the animals from our producers are raised with care.”

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