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Eight UCSB Faculty Members Named AAAS Fellows

Receiving the Peer Recognition were Richard P. Appelbaum, Bruce Bimber,Andrew Cleland, Francis J. “Frank” Doyle III, Catherine Gautier, Joseph Incandela, and Chris G. Van de Walle


Eight faculty members at UC Santa Barbara — the highest one-year total ever for UCSB — have been awarded the distinction of Fellow by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as a Fellow is an honor bestowed upon AAAS members by their peers.

Richard Appelbaum
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Richard Appelbaum

Bruce Bimber
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Bruce Bimber

Andrew Cleland
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Andrew Cleland

Frank Doyle
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Frank Doyle

Catherine Gautier
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Catherine Gautier

Arthur C. Gossard
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Arthur C. Gossard

Joseph Incandela
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Joseph Incandela

Chris G. Van de Walle
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Chris G. Van de Walle

“We are tremendously excited and proud to have a record eight faculty members from UC Santa Barbara elected as AAAS Fellows this year,” said Chancellor Henry T. Yang. “This prestigious honor is a testament to their pioneering achievements in their fields, their dedication to teaching and inspiring others, and their commitment to making a positive contribution to our society. I join with our campus and community in congratulating our distinguished colleagues.”

The newly elected members from UCSB are:

Richard P. Appelbaum, professor of sociology and global and international studies, for distinguished contributions to our understanding of labor, human rights, and the contribution of advanced technologies in fostering sustainable, equitable development in emerging economies.

Bruce Bimber, professor of political science and communication, for distinguished contributions to advancing knowledge about the interfaces of society with science and technology, particularly in the areas of media and politics.

Andrew Cleland, professor of physics, for fundamental contributions to nanomechanics, developing the first nanomechanical structures and demonstrating the first quantum-limited measurements thereof, as well as writing the leading textbook, Foundations of Nanomechanics.

Francis J. “Frank” Doyle III, professor of chemical engineering and Mellichamp Chair in Process Control, for distinguished contributions to the field of systems biology, particularly for the use of control principles in the analysis of biological networks.

Catherine Gautier, professor of geography, for distinguished contributions to the fields of atmospheric radiation physics, climate science, and climate science education.

Arthur C. Gossard, professor of materials and associate vice chancellor, academic affairs, for pioneering the growth of 2-D semiconductor quantum well materials that enabled the first observation of the fractional quantum Hall effect.

Joseph Incandela, professor of physics, for distinguished contributions to particle physics, especially for developing and building silicon trackers that enabled new discoveries at the Fermilab Tevatron.

Chris G. Van de Walle, professor of materials, for pioneering research on the theory of semiconductor interfaces and defects in solids, and for leadership in computational physics and materials science.

“I am very proud of the distinction being bestowed on our faculty,” said Pierre Wiltzius, Susan & Bruce Worster Dean of Science, Division of Mathematical, Life, and Physical Sciences of the College of Letters and Science. “I am particularly pleased by the breadth of research areas covered by these researchers, covering the sciences, social sciences, and engineering.”

Melvin Oliver, SAGE Sara Miller McCune Dean of Social Sciences of the College of Letters and Science, said: “Rich Appelbaum and Bruce Bimber represent the quintessential UCSB social scientist — interdisciplinary, problem-oriented, and engaged in public life. We are proud that their work is recognized by the world’s largest scientific society.”

This year, 503 members have been awarded this honor by AAAS because of their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications. New Fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue (representing science and engineering, respectively) rosette pin on February 19 at the AAAS Fellows Forum, during the 2011 AAAS Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C.

This year’s AAAS Fellows will be announced in the January edition of the journal Science, in the AAAS News & Notes section.

AAAS is the world’s largest general scientific society, and publisher of the journal Science, as well as Science Translational Medicine, and Science Signaling.

AAAS was founded in 1848, and includes some 262 affiliated societies and academies of science, serving 10 million individuals. Science has the largest paid circulation of any peer-reviewed general science journal in the world, with an estimated total readership of 1 million. The nonprofit AAAS is open to all and fulfills its mission to “advance science and serve society” through initiatives in science policy, international programs, science education, and more.



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