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Real Estate

Days


If Real Estate’s breakthrough 2009 debut was a sunny ode to the New Jersey shoreline, then its successor is the ideal counterpoint; a slice of suburban life that’s ripe with lo-fi, surf-y guitars and effortlessly catchy hooks. As evidenced on their self-titled, these Garden State boys know how to capture a moment, and Days is rich with them, evoking visions of lazy afternoon drives through pristine, Wonder Years-esque neighborhoods. (The show even gets a shout-out on the track list.) “Green Aisles” is an early-album stunner that softly grooves around a pretty little electric-guitar line and a tale of youth and reckless abandon. Shortly thereafter, “It’s Real” picks up the pace, punching along with a series of echoing oh-oh-oh’s and some of the band’s most deliberate (and toe-tapping) drum work to date. Still, what makes Days great lies in its casual approach. These are songs that subtly ingrain themselves, making for the best slow-burn album we’ve come across this year.

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