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Rev. Art Stevens (standing).

Mike Clark

Rev. Art Stevens (standing).


A Third Way On Gangs?

Councilmember Cathy Murillo Forms New Anti-Violence Coalition


Thursday, July 25, 2013
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By Tuesday morning ​— ​at a meeting of the Santa Barbara Teen Coalition ​— ​Cathy Murillo was able to articulate the question animating her formation of an organization called the Pro-Youth Movement. “If we don’t want a [gang] injunction, what do we want?” she asked.

At a meeting she cohosted with minister Art Stevens at the Trinity Episcopal Church the previous Saturday, government officials, candidates for office, service providers, intervention workers, educators, and interested citizens ​— ​about 70 people in all ​— ​showed up to air their concerns about youth violence in Santa Barbara. It wasn’t until the tail end of the meeting, when City Council hopeful David Landecker forced her hand, that Murillo addressed the injunction directly.

<b>GOOD COP, BAD COP:</b>  Cathy Murillo (left) sought community input on nonpunitive solutions to gang violence in a forum cohosted by Rev. Art Stevens.
Click to enlarge photo

Mike Clark

GOOD COP, BAD COP: Cathy Murillo (left) sought community input on nonpunitive solutions to gang violence in a forum cohosted by Rev. Art Stevens.

“Saying [the injunction] is on a separate track is like saying we live in a different country,” said Landecker, to which Murillo countered, “You know the political reality.” The political reality is that Murillo is the only councilmember opposed to a proposed gang injunction that would limit the activities of 30 gang-affiliated individuals with criminal histories. Spending her time fighting it directly is paying diminishing political returns.

So she has begun what she called the Pro-Youth Movement in a nod to the Pro-Youth Coalition ​— ​a well-funded, multi-agency assault on youth violence that had been directed by the charismatic activist and former city councilmember Babatunde Folayemi, who died last year. By all accounts, it was extremely successful while at its zenith in the late ’90s, but it didn’t last much longer than the three-year grant cycle that foundations typically offer. Unlike that effort, however, Murillo envisions an all-volunteer army. She noted at the start of her meeting that public attention to youth violence ​— ​like the violence itself ​— ​comes and goes in cycles, so she would like to create a sustained commitment to the city’s youth.

Frank Banales, the executive director of Zona Seca, which provided an administrative home to the Pro-Youth Coalition, noted that public discussions about gangs also follow election cycles. Not only have seven people been sent to the hospital with stab wounds this past month, but elections are coming up in the fall. Along with Landecker, City Council challengers Gregg Hart, Lesley Wiscomb, and Cruzito Cruz attended the meeting. So did coroner Sergeant Sandra Brown, who is running for county sheriff. Add to that the fact that protesters around the nation are decrying a racially asymmetric legal system in the wake of George Zimmerman’s acquittal after shooting and killing a 17-year-old black youth while the City of Santa Barbara is pursuing an injunction, and you have the makings of a long, hot summer.

Banales ​— ​who was not at the meeting ​— ​said that if the city really wants to combat gangs, it will need to double down. Gangs are extremely complicated social phenomena, he said, and having a big heart isn’t going to solve the problem. “You have to have people who are experts in the field working on it,” he said, “and these people can’t do it for free and can’t do it as volunteers.” The Pro-Youth Coalition consisted of 12 community-based organizations and a budget of between $450,000 and $500,000 annually.

Councilmember Dale Francisco (above, center), who supports a gang injunction, said, “I’m not saying that nothing will come of this, but the reality is that volunteers will only put in so much time.”
Click to enlarge photo

Mike Clark

Councilmember Dale Francisco (above, center), who supports a gang injunction, said, “I’m not saying that nothing will come of this, but the reality is that volunteers will only put in so much time.”

The city has spent more than half a million dollars just litigating the injunction. Hart, who did not say much during the meeting, told The Santa Barbara Independent that he opposes the injunction and can’t see how it passes muster in a rational cost-benefit analysis. He is optimistic about the Pro-Youth Movement. Landecker said that given how everything has played out, the injunction makes little sense. But he also expressed more impatience with Saturday’s meeting, the bulk of which consisted of introduction by the participants, who expressed a wide variety of explanations for youth violence.

Sharon Byrne of the Milpas Community Association suggested that stronger neighborhoods would help solve the problem. Nathalie Gensac of Media4Good suggested that nonprofits are fighting each other for money. Joe Sanchez of Palabra said that kids need jobs. Anabel Merino of CAUSE (Central Coast United for a Sustainable Economy) said she’d like to see parents receive more support, a view expressed by others. One point of widespread agreement was that youth should be involved in an entity called the Pro-Youth Movement. None were at Saturday’s meeting, but Murillo pledged to recruit both kids and their families for the next one to be held at 1 p.m. on August 17 at the same location.

While there has been a spate of violent incidents this summer, overall “gang incidents” have decreased since the gang injunction was first floated in early 2011, according to numbers made available by the Santa Barbara Police Department. In 2011, there were 169 incidents. In 2012, there were 74. So far, in 2013, there have been 20, not including July. Those numbers do not address the severity of the crimes committed.

No representatives from the police department attended the meeting, partially because Murillo did not want the discussion to turn adversarial. She said that she refuses to badmouth the police when intervention workers like Keith Terry of YStrive and J.P. Herrada of Palabra voiced concerns about the ramifications of law enforcement tactics. Sgt. Brown said that Herrada made her defensive and suggested that he take a more conciliatory approach. Murillo proposed the formation of a juvenile justice committee, along with committees on education, street outreach, and Las Abuelas (run by SBCC instructor Barbara Lotito, who would like to organize grandmothers to instill kids with a sense of pride in their Latino heritage).

Whether Murillo can leverage volunteer support into an effective wedge against gangs or youth violence in general is still to be seen. At one point, the meeting melted down into a discussion of where the next meeting should be held. On the other hand, this was the beginning of a process that has still to take definitive shape, and the turnout was strong. The late Babatunde Folayemi’s wife, Akivah Northern, stopped in toward the end to offer her blessing. “[Folayemi] would be so proud of so much that is going on today,” she said. “You have the power to change the lives of people here in this community.”

For her part, Murillo said, she is going to hold meetings monthly “until I die.”

Comments

Independent Discussion Guidelines

So, she purposely excluded law enforcement from a discussion on how to end gang violence? Absurd.

Kumbaya........

sacjon (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 11:28 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Meth taskforce

redbunz (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 12:08 p.m. (Suggest removal)

News flash: We all want the gang injunction.

bimboteskie (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 12:49 p.m. (Suggest removal)

News flash, bimboteskie - no we don't. I agree with Banales; there are professional people with a lot of knowledge about gangs, and ignorant community members providing vague, subjective suggestions like "strong neighborhoods" are wasting everyone's time and money.
"Heavy-handed suppression efforts can increase gang cohesion and police-community tensions, and they have a poor track record when it comes to reducing crime and violence. Suppression remains an enormously popular response to gang activity despite concerns by gang experts that such tactics can strengthen gang cohesion and increase tension between law enforcement and community members.
Justice Policy Institute, 2007
http://www.justicepolicy.org/images/u...

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 2:12 p.m. (Suggest removal)

forgot this - particularly former gang members working to reduce gang violence and other gang-related crime, knowledgeable former insiders.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 2:18 p.m. (Suggest removal)

14noscams is apparently using the philosophical opinion of the Justice Policy as though it is fact. Their very mission is against incarceration at any cost as though this is a societal failure and despite having spent hundreds of millions of dollars on early intervention etc we still have gangs and the need for incarceration.
All societies have a certain percentage of miscreants, low lifes, and dung heaps in their midst.

I am still waiting on the point of the headline; some new approach to stopping gangs.

Most of us know that the gang injunction is one of many tools. Unfortunately the left seems to feel that all of these losers are savable; particularly laughable when you see the perpetual mess and lack of interest in their families. Gang participation would go down markedly if families valued education and standards at home. This has been proven to lessen the lure of this activity and this has to start at home. Same old facts-read to your kid at an early age and they do better in school-the better they do in school the less chance they have of being attracted to sociopath gangs-enforce family rules like the old days and know where your kids are-gang numbers go down.

italiansurg (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 2:56 p.m. (Suggest removal)

bimboteskie, according to you, who is "we"? everyone behind a computer commenting on the GI...

killuminati (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 2:57 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Its interesting that conservatives support ad hominem attacks as a general problem-solving tool, but I think there are better ones out there. Right on Crime spokesman Levin, in Austin, Texas, addresses non-violent crime in this statement , "Policies in various states are finally catching up with what we know works," said Marc Levin, director at the Austin-based Center for Effective Justice and a leader in the national Right on Crime campaign, which promotes community-justice solutions.
Not since the early 1990s, when then-Gov. Ann Richards, a Democrat, shook up the historical punishment culture of Texas prisons by opening new drug-treatment prisons focusing on rehabilitation, has such a dramatic trend emerged, some experts say. Only this time, conservative Republicans are driving the reforms that began in 2007, as fiscal conservatism gained the upper hand over tough-on-crime policies."
Texas incarceration policy predictably differs from California's, since it's not the result of lobbying and campaign contributions by the California Correctional Police Officer's Association, opposed to all alternatives to incarceration. California has built 23 new prisons since the early 80's, when CCPOA began gaining political influence, the number of prison guards increased from 5,600 to 30,000, and recidivism has increased from 10% in 1977 to the present 77%. CCPOA spends around $8 million/year of its $23 million/year dues on political lobbying. Alternative sentencing is a conservative Republican policy, promoted by "New Right" spokesman Richard Viguerie, based on decreased crime and recidivism, although the data refers only to non-violent crime.
http://watchdog.org/91061/conservativ...

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 5:11 p.m. (Suggest removal)

At last steps toward smart positive solutions that don'tt turn us into a police-state.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 5:15 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Its interesting that conservatives support ad hominem attacks as a general problem-solving tool, but I think there are better ones out there. Right on Crime spokesman Levin, in Austin, Texas, addresses non-violent crime in this statement , "Policies in various states are finally catching up with what we know works," said Marc Levin, director at the Austin-based Center for Effective Justice and a leader in the national Right on Crime campaign, which promotes community-justice solutions.
Not since the early 1990s, when then-Gov. Ann Richards, a Democrat, shook up the historical punishment culture of Texas prisons by opening new drug-treatment prisons focusing on rehabilitation, has such a dramatic trend emerged, some experts say. Only this time, conservative Republicans are driving the reforms that began in 2007, as fiscal conservatism gained the upper hand over tough-on-crime policies."
Texas incarceration policy predictably differs from California's, since it's not the result of lobbying and campaign contributions by the California Correctional Police Officer's Association, opposed to all alternatives to incarceration. California has built 23 new prisons since the early 80's, when CCPOA began gaining political influence, the number of prison guards increased from 5,600 to 30,000, and recidivism has increased from 10% in 1977 to the present 77%. CCPOA spends around $8 million/year of its $23 million/year dues on political lobbying. Alternative sentencing is a conservative Republican policy, promoted by "New Right" spokesman Richard Viguerie, based on decreased crime and recidivism, although the data refers only to non-violent crime.
http://watchdog.org/91061/conservativ...
Poverty, parenting problems, drug and alcohol use, older sibling gang members,inadequate education, lack of job opportunities, and other factors mentioned in this article influence gang membership, a complicated issue.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 5:21 p.m. (Suggest removal)

When you have an economy based on the concept that immigrants from some countries are expected to come here and become part of our culture while seeing immigrants from other countries as being nothing more than expendable cogs in a cheap labor Ponzi Scheme it's no wonder we have the gang problem Santa Barbara has.

The problem is, business interests on the Right don't wan't their scam exposed, and people on the Left have been conditioned not to say anything for fear of "immigrant-bashing".

billclausen (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 5:40 p.m. (Suggest removal)

BC: Yep, I think for most people who are powerless and defenseless and labeled as such by power and money, have little in the way of positive role models or hope for change, gang affiliation isn't hard to see as protection and identity and status and money. The left, in addition, has its traditional affiliation with organized labor, which is a positive force in some areas in society and negative in others, currently - there are plenty of workers who need the protection and clout of organized labor, Windermere Farms most recently here, Walmart employees, Indonesian garment workers, etc, etc. When Mother Jones is publishing articles critical of CCPOA and Republicans support rehabilitation of criminal offenders and community-based programs as alternatives to lock-em-up based on compassion and healing and moral/ethical beliefs and in the best interests of their families, left and right can't really be viewed in black and white.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 6:49 p.m. (Suggest removal)

dolphinpod14 (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 6:50 p.m. (Suggest removal)

In addition, if you treat kids like criminals before they've even committed a crime, you're just setting up a no win situation for everybody.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 25, 2013 at 7:21 p.m. (Suggest removal)

True, Ken.

ahem (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 12:05 a.m. (Suggest removal)

How exactly are we treating "kids" like criminals before they have committed a crime?

And who knew that "...for most people who are powerless and defenseless and labeled as such by power and money, have little in the way of positive role models or hope for change, gang affiliation isn't hard to see as protection and identity and status and money." So until we give every illegal alien full resident status and protect their self image the gang problem is our fault?

For all of you apologists out there, try reading this book I just read-Book review: 'Midnight in Mexico' by Alfredo Corchado - Collections ...
articles.washingtonpost.com › Collections › Mexico City
This former farm worker and liberal bureau chief set out to chronicle the wonder of Mexican politics and instead came to the inevitable conclusion that Mexico has imploded and murdered any culture that it did have. That is their export to the U.S.

Just how do you account for the fact that Americans of Asian descent kick all of our butts with their performance? They were held in indentured servitude, looked down on as servants and second class citizens, and generally stereotyped in a negative manner. Their gang related issues were nearly irrelevant when compared to the comical mess that (mostly) illegal alien Latino's have wrought on this country. Asian Americans did not blame the U.S. when they had ethnic gangs and instead used their own family units to shame anyone or any family that condoned deviant behaviour.

italiansurg (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 7:31 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Yes, Asians that were once heavily discriminated against here are doing incredibly well. In fact, our university system has been so overwhelmed by successful Asian students that they try to obtain "diversity" by relabeling affirmative minority admission practices to "disadvantaged" minorities in order to exclude Asians from taking advantage of them. What makes Asians a minority that's not "disadvantaged"? Maybe their work ethic and family support is a huge factor.The point is a as a group, Asians aren't "disadvantaged", because they CHOSE not to be.

Botany (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 8:26 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Billions of dollars have been spent on the tobacco tax First Five pre-schools in this state with the promise those kids would be better prepared for school, graduate and go on to college in greater numbers and stay out of gangs and incarceration.

What happened to those billions of dollars of tax money now that First Five has been embedded into a full generation of California kids?

Gangs are criminal enterprises and have no reason to exist anywhere in civil society. A gang injunction is the proper first step to their eventual total elimination.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 9:11 a.m. (Suggest removal)

foo- I laughed out loud in 2007 when I saw a huge billboard in Tijuana that advertised "First Five California" to everyone in Baja... Who does that? And why?

azuresees (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 10:55 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Gang injunctions in general have a good record for reducing crime in the short term. There's no evidence that gang injunctions have positive long-term effects; they don't address the socioeconomic conditions that encourage gangs. They divert funds from programs that keep kids out of gangs, like after-school programs, rehabilitation programs, and job training programs, and may increase crime in areas outside of the injunction. The San Fernando Valley Blythe Street gang injunction resulted in a 300% increase in violent crime immediately after the injunction was in effect and doubled the violent crime rate in surrounding communities. One of the San Bernardino injunctions increased gang activity. New York City has used intervention and rehabilitation programs rather than injunctions, and gang-related crime has decreased much more than in LA, which has concentrated on injunctions and police action. In New York, gang activity and gang crime have decreased as the number of recreation centers and lob opportunities has increased. Incarcerating juvenile gang members is bad for public safety. It labels kids as criminals,and increases the probability of future criminal behavior . Police involvement is very expensive, and its cost isn't compared with the cost of positive intervention programs that work.
There have been many hundreds of gang injunctions in the US, and there's a lot of information on how well they've worked, and although every community and gang and gang member is unique, it makes sense to use the knowledge that other communities have gained through experience, rather than using guesswork. California has the worst track record in the country for reforming criminals and the highest rate of incarceration,
so we know that we can improve our situation by using practices that have worked well in other places.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 1:45 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Socio-economic conditions do not create or encourage gangs.

Failed peer values create and encourage gangs. Ban gang, and you end gangs. They work short, mid and long term. They serve no purpose other than encouraging violence.

There is nothing about any socio-economic "condition" that encourages violent associations. Stop making global excuses for poor individual choices.

Typical: deny, dismiss, divert, denigrate and ...... do nothing. Not interested in that tired old pattern. Time for the gang injunction is now. Santa Barbara is changing so get used to it. Save the world on your own time. We are saving Santa Barbara now.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 26, 2013 at 9:33 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Go easy foo, at least 14 admits that "Gang injunctions in general have a good record for reducing crime in the short term".

!4 your statistics are so off and so broad and you have thrown so many things together that your point of view become a mess.

Here's a competing opinion from the University of Chicago:
Gangs | CRIME LAB | The University of Chicago
crimelab.uchicago.edu/page/gangs‎
Crime Lab member Jeffrey Grogger of the University of Chicago evaluated the effects of gang injunctions in Los Angeles County, one of the most gang-plagued ...

Here's another academic, peer reviewed article that shows a DIRECT LINK between decreased crime and G.I.'s:
Evaluation of Gang Injunctions | Stephen A. Morreale - Academia.edu
academia.edu/479421/Evaluation_of_Gang_Injunctions‎
"Gang injunctions (civil law suits against gangs) are a proactive attempt to reduce gang ... Chicago Illinois Conference Notes Levy, D. (1997, November 12).

Comparing LA and New York is just weird because, as in all MAJOR cities, crime has gone down in both by a remarkable level. Oh yea, New York also deploys "stop and frisk" so I guess you are good with that which is awesome.

So, we agree that gang injunctions have a good record of reducing crime in the short term and that they are not the only answer. Awesome again.

italiansurg (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 6:56 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Measuring gang activity in mono-culture, large urban ghettos has no relevance to Santa Barbara, where no broken down, deep seated mono-culture social entrapments exist.

No one in this entire town lives more than a few walkable blocks away from some positive, alternate resource that cancels completely any claimed justification for continued gang existence in this town.

Gangs are 100% negative and corrosive influences. They have no place in this town. Period.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 9:57 a.m. (Suggest removal)

italiansurg: Some of the references used in my post: All statistics in my post are referenced. Short-term solutions aren't a robust solution.
solution.Reduction in crime, accompanied by increased crime in areas adjacent to injunction areas, isn't a positive effect. Short-term decrease in crime accompanied by eliminating budgets for long-term solutions that work isn't a positive effect. Sociopaths have low harm avoidance behavior and higher risk-taking behavior relative to others, and legal penalties for gang involvement are less effective than in a normal population, Robert Hare, numerous publications. Law enforcement programs that violate the legal rights of gang members reduce respect for the law and society. foofighter is posting bs with no correlation with fact, very counterproductive to problem-solving. Titles follow links.
www.streetgangs.com, blythe street gang injunction, www.ncjrs.gov/pdffiles1/nij/www.usc.e..., Can civil gang injunctions change communities, www.usc.edu/uscnews/newsroom/news_rel..., Gang injunctions give communities short-term relief, studies show, www.academia.edu/479421/Evaluation_of..., Evaluation of gang injunctions, .www.ingentaconnect.com/content/pal/lst/2007/00000005/.../art00002, An invading Army: A civil Gang Injunction in Sounthern California, www.worldcat.org/, No place for kids:The Case for Reducing Juvenile Incarceration, http://nirn.fpg.unc.edu/sites/nirn.fp... Justice Delinquency Prevention.pdf,, A Seamless Web of Support: Effective Strategies for Redirecting the School‐to‐
Prison Pipeline, and A Summary of Best Practices in School Reentry for Incarcerated Youth Returning Home,
,http://www.sdcda.org/preventing/gangs/injunctions.html, San Diego DA, Gang Injunctions, www.streetgangs.com/legal/injunctions..., Gang Injunctions

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 11:32 a.m. (Suggest removal)

italiansurg: What's this about "gang related issues were nearly irrelevant when compared to the comical mess that (mostly) illegal alien Latino's have wrought on this country. Asian Americans did not blame the U.S. when they had ethnic gangs and instead used their own family units to shame anyone or any family that condoned deviant behaviour."
Are you really unaware of current Asian gangs? Possibly a little racism?

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 11:42 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Los Angeles with its millions of populaton and hundreds of neighborhoods is not Santa Barbara.

Border town San Diego is not Santa Barbara.

Stop this academic nonsense comparing apples to oranges to support doing nothing. There is no reason for any gang to exist in Santa Barbara. They are criminal enterprises. They cannot be justified in any way shape or form in this town.

Gang membership and activities waste money and lives. And have wasted even more money and lives allowing these perpetually ineffectual task forces to dance around the core issue of gangs one more time.

There is much anti-social behavior civil society does not condone. Gangs are but one of them. We don't allow selling child prostitutes on our streets. Ignoring the damage gangs do to our children is in the same category. Gangs are unacceptable choices for any of our young people to be making. No excuses. Stop this at its source. Ban gangs.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 12:07 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Ah foo's able to sneak anti-intellectualism in with his police state advocacy. I consider people like foo to be a greeater threat to the well being of decent people in the long term. A "little racism" when it comes to foo, ha! That's being generous.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 1:30 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I am well aware of various Asian street gangs and the pittance they are compared to the number of Asian groups. I am also aware that Asians out perform all the rest of us and they too have a very few unavoidable miscreants. So now that we have irrefutably demonstrated that your hypothesis is idiotic, what's next? Racism? Huh?
Abject stupidity perhaps on your part? Denial? Guilt?

italiansurg (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 2:32 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Foo: Let's ban cancer, too, while we're at it.

"if a program could successfully target the worst offenders, it could save as much as $17 million (based on a 6-year career), or $36 million (based on a 15-year career) per high-risk youth who is saved from a life of crime"
(1998)
http://www.epi.msu.edu/janthony/reque...

Homeboy Industries was born in 1988 and is now the largest gang
intervention, re-hab and re-entry program in the United States. Founder Father Greg Boyle served on the State Commission for Juvenile Justice
and Delinquency Prevention, The National Youth Gang Center Board and the Attorney General’s Defending Childhood Task Force. He was chaplain in the Islas Marias Penal Colony in Mexico and at Folsom prison. Homeboys website has a link to request him as a speaker.
http://www.homeboyindustries.org/what...

San Francisco East Bay YMCA has some great stuff going, too.
http://us.ymcaeastbay.org/news

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 2:41 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Homeboy Industries is amazing, and their products top notch! An amazing program I had the honor of observing on a video shoot.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 2:49 p.m. (Suggest removal)

It's amazing that all the so-called "law and order" peops commenting here also support vigilantism (a la George Zimmerman). So which is it folks, pure hypocrisy? Racism? Idiocy?

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 3:55 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Ken_Volok: Mental illness shouldn't be ruled out.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 5:09 p.m. (Suggest removal)

And another gang task force ........ does nothing. The community has long known about Homeboys Industries. Nothing was ever done.

And again attacking gang issues in the large LA mono-culture is very different from what is at stake in SB where the gangs are smaller, fight over meaningless turf and drugs with a false sense of manhood. Even watching their buddies perp-walked into long prison terms from the cheering galleries, has done nothing.

Just get them off the streets. Doesn't matter who makes up the gangs, any group that formally requires increasing acts of violence, crime and vandalism as their membership jumping-in ticket with the automatic Gold Membership Card going for murder has no place in this town.

Those are sick values and those throwing up road blocks to eliminate this scourge from our town need some serious explaining to do to the rest of us.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 27, 2013 at 7:06 p.m. (Suggest removal)

KV-You need to get in earlier so that your stereotype is novel. 14 already threw in racism; how utterly liberal and Progressive...
If 14 knew anything about the Bay he/she/it would not be foisting the EB YMCA as having any success at all...

italiansurg (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 7:40 a.m. (Suggest removal)

EB YMCA again addresses the large, isolated Richmond mono-culture. This has no relevance to Santa Barbara.

As if we don't have similar youth organizations already only a few blocks away from most young SB residents? YMCA, Boys and Girls Inc ...dozens of very active youth organizations.

Yet a small sub-set of youth continue to insists crime, violence, drugs and vandalism is their after-school activity of choice.

The group is small and disproportionately vicious. Ban these groups and continue to support the league of positive youth activities we already have in this town.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 11:09 a.m. (Suggest removal)

Hold parents accountable for the illegal acts of their minor children, while at the same time making schools more welcoming to non-English speaking parents. We need a multi-generational approach if we are going to solve this problem.

blackpoodles (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 12:24 p.m. (Suggest removal)

re Homeboys: “LAPD Chief Charlie Beck did a cameo for "Southland" recently ... and got a check for more than a grand… He's donating the money to Homeboy Industries. ”The city of Los Angeles promised to make $500,000 available as payment for services. Jeff Carr, who runs L.A.'s gang-intervention efforts for Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, explained that the city intended to pass along $500,000 in federal aid (to Homeboys) previously earmarked for Boyle Heights, but had discovered the account was $160,000 short... The mayor's office is trying to scrape the rest of that money .In the meantime, Carr said, the city plans to spend $200,000 buying T-shirts and polo shirts from Homeboys, the mayor will start working the phones trying to drum up major donors to help Homeboy through until fall. In the meantime, there's the virtual car wash. One of the most surprising faces is the LAPD's chief of detectives, Charlie Beck."
LA Times July 11, 2009
What is the projected cost of SBPD's enforcement of a gang
injunction?
It's unfortunate that local non-profits don't have programs specifically targeted at high-risk kids.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 3:05 p.m. (Suggest removal)

What do you mean we don't have programs specifically targeting high-risk kids? There are plenty. Haven't worked. What do you mean non-english speaking parents are not welcomed by SB schools? They have translators, spanish only sessions, free ESL, after hours meeting times bi-lingual just about everything.

Will the excuses never end. You have some tough kids who celebrate violence and many are young adults; not just kids underage. Take the young adults out of the equation, make associations with them banned and you just might directly impact the younger kids themselves who can then get diverted into the dozens of programs this city already offers.

You have to get the core bad elements out of the equation. Why are you against that? And please do not globalize your answer. Why don't you want those who are named as the bad core elements out of the equation. Period. That is all the gang injunction does - identifies the known bad elements and tries to isolate them as best as the law allows.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 4:08 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Quote from your second reference: " Enforcement must be just one component of a balanced approach which includes suppression, intervention, and prevention, if a truly long term gang solution is to be reached (Greene & Pranis, 2007). The efficacy of gang injunctions remains unclear, even though the use of such injunctions has increased over the past 25 years."

The real problem with a Santa Barbara gang injunction - SBPD

“I think that part of our training will be to focus on being professional,” said Sanchez. “We have had officers over the years that have not been who are no longer here. I’m a pretty tough disciplinarian, most people know that, and I think the focus is going to be on behavior…on criminal behavior.”

- See more at: http://thebottomline.as.ucsb.edu/2013...

My oldest son's Bay area business was one of two businesses covered in an August 26,2010 Wall Street Journal Article. (different last names)

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 8:38 p.m. (Suggest removal)

I am not opposed to isolating the bad actors, and the gang injunction may be necessary. But if you think there is no racial prejudice in our local schools, you should go talk to the American kids who get repeatedly tested on English proficiency just because they have brown skin and a Hispanic surname.

blackpoodles (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 10:37 p.m. (Suggest removal)

That is the problem handing out affirmative action benefits or votes for political candidates, or even voter district equities based just upon surnames. Or using maiden names as middle names for political gain. Identity politics corrupts both ways.

These are bad actors who coincidentally are hispanics. Focus on the bad actor parts of the gang injunction equation and stop looking for problems that either are not there, or very easily remedied by the courts.

Gangs themselves as they are constituted in this town are criminal enterprises. I think you are the one who needs to take off the racist goggles and care more about the activities of gang members; and not the ethnic make-up of those who perpetrate them.

Please work with getting them off our streets and out of our town so the 99% of the rest of the population can live in safety and peace and kids across this town will get a better chance to grow up without fear and negative peer pressure from those vicious but luckily very few who damage lives across this town, disproproptionate to their real numbers.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 10:51 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Ther'es a LOT of white gangmembers. And I'd never thought I'd see the day that "foofighter" would advocate chasing the "1%" from our area. That's total Marxism buddy, this is America.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 11:08 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Under today's identity politics, what used to be labeled "hispanic or latino" is now post Zimmerman called "white" so yes, let's get rid of the "white" gangs if this is how you insist on viewing this matter, KV. I don't, but I know that does not stop you from your brand of snappy, though ill-formed rejoinders.

99% of the rest of our town is held hostage by this 1% gang violence which has no sounding in fairness whatsoever. Isolate the few that are identified as bad actors. That is your 99% vs 1% ratio, KV. Deal with it.

This insistence on the ethnic identity of gang members serves only to distract and distort the underlying issue: gangs are criminal enterprises and have no place in our town.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 28, 2013 at 11:28 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Bet you Daryl Genis want"s a gang injunction!

bimboteskie (anonymous profile)
July 29, 2013 at 1:28 a.m. (Suggest removal)

This is really scary - on the FBI website:
Gangs encourage members, associates, and relatives to obtain law enforcement, judiciary, or legal employment in order to gather information on rival gangs and law enforcement operations. Gang infiltration of the military continues to pose a significant criminal threat, as members of at least 53 gangs have been identified on both domestic and international military installations. Gang members who learn advanced weaponry and combat techniques in the military are at risk of employing these skills on the street when they return to their communities.
Many gang members continue to engage in gang activity while incarcerated.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 29, 2013 at 3:04 p.m. (Suggest removal)

14noscams, a lot of what the FBI is detailing there are white supremist gangs.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 29, 2013 at 3:06 p.m. (Suggest removal)

W. Bush needed cannon fodder in the Middle East so military recruitment standrads were changed to allow people with felonies and affiliations such as you describe into the military. Obviously it's not the entire military before knees start jerking and people somehow think it's my fault.

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 29, 2013 at 3:08 p.m. (Suggest removal)

KV: I agree, but the feds site also has this -
Gang recruitment of active duty military personnel constitutes a significant criminal threat to the US military. Members of nearly every major street gang, as well as some prison gangs and OMGs, have been reported on both domestic and international military installations. Through transfers and deployments, military-affiliated gang members expand their culture and operations to new regions nationwide and worldwide, undermining security and law enforcement efforts to combat crime.
correctional staff caught smuggling cell phones have been
successfully prosecuted only when the phone was connected to a more serious charge such as drug distribution, and district attorney offices rarely prosecute unless a more serious offense is involved. Incarcerated gang members communicate covertly with illegal cell phones to plan or direct criminal activities such as drug distribution, assault, and murder. Cell phones smuggled into correctional facilities pose the greatest threat to institution safety.
Many incarcerated gang members continue to engage in gang activities following incarceration and use their connections inside prison to commit crime in the community. Prison gang members influence and control gang activity on the street, and exploit street gangs for money and other resources.
The feds are saying gang distinctions are blurring - there's collaboration, Asian gangs are getting bigger, more into white collar. Sounds like it's turning into something like Cosa Nostra on meth and steroids, still tagging, tho - FBI has a photo of a water truck in Afghanistan w/tag Support Your Local Hell's Angels.
This is more of a paradigm issue than a crime issue in many cases- the government gangstas wear the white hats and have the worst penalties for rats, Contra weapons and CIA coke and Afghanistan heroin businesses make hat color essential as other gang colors.
http://www.fbi.gov/stats-services/pub...

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 6:12 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Thanks my dear friend 14, after that I need a drink. Where do you even start cleaning that up?

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 6:25 p.m. (Suggest removal)

KV - Thanks, me too. I was just hearing the KCSB replay of our last night's Channel 17 show -had a phone interview w/ a Honduras reporter, we miss a lot in the control room. She says the gov. has 3 currency wharehouses, 1 filled with weapons, 1 with US dollars, one with drugs - the 3 most common currencies.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 6:40 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Hey, here's an idea. Let's just do nothing. Nothing, No free rides to Cottage Hospital. No expensive investigations, trials or convictions. No penalties. No hazmat teams to clean the blood off the sidewalks. No rights for grieving relatives. Nope, the problem is too big and we can make it even bigger so let's do nothing in return. Just leave the bodies on the streets, and wait it out.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 10:22 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Or you could just end the "Drug War".

Ken_Volok (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 10:36 p.m. (Suggest removal)

Bradley Manning and Snowden have shown that crime is defined by the identity of the actors, not by the actions. Teaching kids that society OK's the use of US Apache helicopters to murder journalists and kids (which could have been recorded by anyone on the street with a camera), but says it's a crime with a potential death penalty to acknowledge it, is supporting gang crime by socially acceptable criminals. How can we expect anything other than organized crime in the rest of society? We need to teach parents to teach ethics, but if they do, will the NSA disappear them? We have plenty of similar examples in SBPD and the law - if we say a cop forged our name, the DA or city attorney or the cops go after us, and give the cop a promotion and a raise. If we forge someone's name, we're a felon. We want SB kids to respect the law? Make the law respectable if we have any respect for our kids, regardless of their skin color or whether their parents can afford a lawyer.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 11:55 p.m. (Suggest removal)

KV: Before the costs of the Drug War end us.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
July 30, 2013 at 11:58 p.m. (Suggest removal)

This is so depressing it could drive even ME to drink.

billclausen (anonymous profile)
July 31, 2013 at 5:48 a.m. (Suggest removal)

KV: show us by example any country that legalized drugs that subsequently lived in peace, harmony, rainbows and unicorns. Facts; not anecdotes, please.

foofighter (anonymous profile)
July 31, 2013 at 9:03 a.m. (Suggest removal)

“I prefer a painful truth over any blissful fantasy,”(Bradley) Manning wrote in an online chat. Minutes later he added: “I think I’ve been traumatized too much by reality, to care about consequences of shattering the fantasy.” And he also wrote: “I want people to see the truth … regardless of who they are … because without information, you cannot make informed decisions as a public.”
Information clearing House, July 30, 2013

Treating drug addicts as criminals is destined to fuel the rise of HIV and other infections," Lasha Goguadze, the Red Cross' Senior Health Officer, testified. "Laws and prosecutions do not stop people from taking drugs.... Governments should recognize once and for [all] that a humanitarian drug policy works. March 30, 2012

14noscams (anonymous profile)
August 1, 2013 at 9:45 a.m. (Suggest removal)

"Keith Terry of YStrive and J.P. Herrada of Palabra voiced concerns about the ramifications of law enforcement tactics." I don't think a valid approach to dealing with local youth gangs can exclude the behavoir and practices of law enforcement. We can't reasonably deny problems with SBPD, and I think Murillo is weakening the community effort by ignoring Herrada's and Terry's concerns, which represent concerns of the Latino community. I think a coalition, by definition, must base its actions on the input of all members.

14noscams (anonymous profile)
August 2, 2013 at 10:49 a.m. (Suggest removal)

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