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Public Guardian Abuse


Is the Public Guardian helping to stop elder abuse, or is it the other way around?

Families are made out to be bad (and sometimes that’s the case), but the system is really scary. Once an elder is “rescued” and put under the Public Guardian, the strategy is to isolate, medicate and take the estate. Like with professional conservators, a redistribution of wealth occurs away from families — it’s all about money.

If the family starts getting some unity, then efforts are made to divide and conquer.

Often, the elder is denied contact with family, friends, and other visitors, and those concerned about his or her welfare have their character assassinated in documents handed to the court. Often, the conservatees are given dangerous antipsychotic drugs (often force medicated) like Seroquel that the FDA says nearly double the risk of death for older people (see the toxic medicine brochure at canhr.org). One side effect is the drugs put the older people in a comatose state, and that makes them easier to manage and hence more profitable for nursing homes. Once under these drugs, it’s easy to say the older person has dementia and is going downhill.

It’s people with money that the Public Guardian is mainly interested in, and those people have their rights and freedom taken away against their will — and they’re forced to pay for all the “help” given them, the attorneys, the court investigator, and the whole profit-making network (amazing how cozy they are with each other).

No one seems to care about the welfare of people without money. For example, older homeless people are usually allowed to remain on the streets. If the Public Guardian gets ahold of them, they are typically sent to a miserable state-sponsored lockdown facility, in which they don’t live very long.

Citizens need to be watching to prevent elder abuse by the Public Guardian. If we don’t stop it happening to other people, sooner or later it may be ourselves who are the victims.

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