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Keep It Rural


The current plans for the Mission Canyon Corridor would dramatically impact the historic resources and rural ambience of the area. Putting holes in Historic Landmark walls and adding a new, pre-fab, pedestrian bridge to the Natural History Museum is a foolish idea.

Less radical, common sense improvements could include well-maintained crosswalks at strategic places, including the bridge and on the east side where students with teachers come from the Roosevelt School to the Museum. There needs to be a path for everyone on the east side of the road and a crosswalk at the firehouse on Foothill Road would be helpful.

Straightening and widening Mission Canyon Road will cause speeding. Safety should remain a top priority. A steady flow of traffic at 25mph is more sensible for this scenic and historic route.

The “No Parking” zone should be enforced. Parking in the Corridor is dangerous and uses valuable pedestrian space. Striping at cross streets would make them more noticeable.

Also, all power lines should be buried for safety, visibility and pedestrian space. Uniform, compatible signage would be an improvement.

These are just some ways to help and still keep the essence of the cultural and historic entry to Mission Canyon. This rural ambience is why we live here.

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