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Lisa Willis

Cannabis Predictions for 2019

Corporate Cannabis Ahead


In the last few years, I have glommed onto the idea that I don’t have to make any resolutions or predictions for the New Year. Those goals and guessing games that are nothing but pathways to failure now are set curbside next to the Christmas trees and overstuffed recycling bins. I do, however, like to make plans, say, map out an itinerary for a trip to Italy, which trumps the latest diet, er, eating plan any ol’ day. I also like to hear how the experts, even self-appointed ones, weigh in on a variety of subjects: the economy, world affairs, the Kardashians, what have you.

So, it was with great interest I read “24 Cannabis Predictions for 2019 That Will Come True,” compiled by the Leafly.com staff. The subject matter intrigues me, of course. Equally intriguing is the pure chutzpah of the brazen title. (Note to self: Circle back around at the end of 2019 to see how on the money the Leafly staff was.)

I’m not going to summarize all the 24 predictions. What I am going to do is highlight a few in the context of educating oneself on cannabis and the emerging local cannabis culture. First, let’s review a bit of the Cannabis by the Sea catechism.

(1) Know thy source. Who is growing the cannabis you are consuming? You don’t need to be on a first-name basis with the cultivator(s), but familiarity with the farm and its business practices is to your benefit. The more local, the better.

(2) To thine own self be true. Honor your body by nourishing it. What works for others may not be for you. Similarly, what’s trending or new may not suit your needs. Sure, try different products, but only if you want.

(3) Keep it legal. The best way to ensure you have the safest and cleanest cannabis is go the legal and compliant route.

Along with California cannabis prices coming down, Leafly predicts there will be more environmental awareness in the packaging of products. Furthermore, the market for flower/bud will lose popularity to manufactured items such as vape pens and edibles.

Juxtaposing the above rosy predictions is “More Corporate Giants Enter. More alcohol and tobacco multi-national corporations will buy stakes in cannabis companies using Canadian companies as a global investment vehicle.” Should this play out, buying legal and compliant cannabis won’t be an issue. Knowing your source and keeping family farms in business likely will become a thing of the past. Additionally, given the past performance of corporate giants’ marketing and advertising, separating the wheat from the chaff in body care will become more challenging.

Another red-flag-waving prediction is “Conglomerates Gonna Conglomerate. Stores like MedMen and Have a Heart will expand into newly legal states and capture bigger shares of new licenses, either directly or through acquisitions and/or licensing/management arrangements. The consolidation has begun.” I don’t know about you, but when it comes to agricultural products, fruits and vegetables for example, I prefer mine to come from a place like a farmers’ market rather than a Walmart.

It will be interesting to see what plays out in the cannabis industry. I think we can be sure that it will continue to grow (like a weed). We also will need to sharpen our caveat emptor skills. Insist on knowing from where your cannabis comes. Remember your body is a temple; treat it like one.

Here’s to a wonderful 2019! May it hold everything you wish and then some.

Authors Tina Fanucchi-Frontado and Amy Marie Orozco along with their partner Leigh-Anne Anderson have formed KopSun to provide education and information to support and safely explore the new cannabis culture. To learn more, visit KopSun.com, or email the authors at info@kopsun.com.

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