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Posted on June 5 at 12:59 p.m.

Loonpt: You sound like a victim! There's hope for you.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 5 at 11:43 a.m.

Dr. Dan: Nearly exterminated indigenous culture? The Chumash like to point out that there are not gone. There are more Indians around the country than ever.

Yep, this is a debate about who's holier? Some would have it the atheists are holier. Perhaps some would have it the Chumash are holier. Some would contend the illegal immigrant is holier, or the non-hetero-sexual is holier, or perhaps women are holier...The battle for sainthood is wide open...lots of competition...what's changed is that to qualify for the race, you must be first and foremost, perceived as a victim....yes, that's it...and if my memory serves me well, the Church used to prefer martyrs. And so it goes.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 5 at 6:57 a.m.

DavyBrown you are certainly in your rights to have an opinion about sainthood for Padre Serra in the public sphere. You are certainly allowed to have your opinion as a Catholic too. But in the Church, it will be Pope Francis who makes the final call. If you are a Catholic, you will respect that fact.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 5 at 6:49 a.m.

On Father Serra being put up by the Catholic Church for Possible Sainthood:
This is an affair of the Church and not of the public at large, although in a Democracy everyone is free to comment about everything. I believe that Jefferson et al. said that a successful Democracy depends on 'virtue' in the People. Virtue was 18th century code for education. So if we are going to discuss Padre Serra, first we need to know 'the facts' of his biography. Second, if we are going to discuss his qualifications for 'Sainthood' we need to know what a saint is, right? All of this can be discussed in secular terms, since, as we all know...there is supposed to be a separation of Church and State.

The 21 California Missions, for which Padre Serra was largely responsible, were recently refused preservation funds for their upkeep and restoration because Barbara Boxer and others thought it was inappropriate that public funds support California Missions. I would disagree with this. So let's not begin our public considerations by imagining that Mission Santa Barbara is some kind of institution receiving public welfare. And uniquely, I hasten to add, the Santa Barbara Mission is still in the hands of the Franciscans AND is the repository of Mission Records going all the way back to California and Santa Barbara's beginnings. This rich heritage is a stupendous resource for the community of Santa Barbara. and also Santa Barbara's Catholics. I would also add that many Chumash today are Catholic. Let me know again, why should we denigrate Padre Serra, the Santa Barbara Mission, and our history?

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 4 at 2:22 p.m.

Wonder what Padre Serra would have said about the oil spill if he were alive? How's that for an opening to blahblah...

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 4 at 6:06 a.m.

Father Serra was present at the founding of the Santa Barbara Presidio in 1782 and he wanted to start the Santa Barbara Mission but he was refused the right to do so by the authorities. He was always in a struggle trying to make the authorities do the right things as he saw it. He died in 1784. Since the Santa Barbara Mission is founded in 1786, one would be hard pressed to throw any big 'sins' here on the shoulders of Serra.

The oldest City Planning document in the world is the Spanish 'Plan of the Indies' which describes in great detail what the Spanish are to do in the founding of the various settlements throughout the New World. Have a look at it. It explains why we like the look of the City of Santa Barbara.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 3 at 5:46 p.m.

There are documents to all this history. But let's just generalize. Generally speaking the Chumash rather liked the Mission fathers who by in large were looking out for their well-being while at the same time proselytizing them and trying to convert them into good Catholics. The Padres were here performing their religious duties in a sincere effort to convert them into what they saw as a better life. They viewed the Indians as children, God's children. Padres often protected the Indians from the wayward, evil intentioned Spanish soldier. After 1810 supply ships no longer arrived in any regular way and there were shortages of everything for everybody. This is the way it was. This was just one of these encounters that happened after 1492...Spaniards showed up as early as 1602 (Vizcaino in Monterey). Father Serra in 1770. Let's try to remember that the past is a foreign country and your 21st century notions of the good and beautiful utopia pre-1492 or 1602 in California are nothing more than a fantasy you use for your political headbashing here and now in this place and time. Chumash chief Yananoli decided that there might be some benefits to working with these new guys from Spain. Perhaps he thought it might give him some advantages in his struggles with the other tribal chieftains of the Chumash. In any case, here we are. Give Padre Serra a break.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 3 at 3:20 p.m.

What is this? Some kind of 'holier than thou' competition. Just two suggestions from me. Padre Serra is much more interesting and important than anyone is writing about here. Second, in 1818 with the Hypolito Bouchard raid on California, this French revolutionary offered to the Natives the opportunity to 'rise up and throw off their chains'. What happened was that the Chumash formed into fighting groups and defended the territory, fighting WITH with the Spanish. Six years later, now under Corrupt Mexican Rule with the Missions being taken away and divided up "Putin style" into profitable Ranchos for the Mexican Political favored elites, the Chumash finally revolted. Let's place the blame there and not on Padre Serra. My bet is that most of you don't know a thing about Padre Serra.

On Tribal Leaders Oppose Serra Sainthood

Posted on June 3 at 3:17 p.m.

What is this? Some kind of 'holier than thou' competition. Just two suggestions from me. Padre Serra is much more interesting and important than anyone is writing about here. Second, in 1818 with the Hypolito Bouchard raid on California, this French revolutionary offered to the Natives the opportunity to 'rise up and throw off their chains'. What happened was that the Chumash formed into fighting groups and defended the territory, fighting WITH with the Spanish. Six years later, now under Corrupt Mexican Rule with the Missions being taken away and divided up "Putin style" into profitable Ranchos for the Mexican Political favored elites, the Chumash finally revolted. Let's place the blame there and not on Padre Serra. My bet is that most of you don't know a thing about Padre Serra.

On Native American Protest

Posted on May 22 at 3:12 p.m.

Excellent. Just truly excellent. I support this woman and her thinking. It has been so refreshing over the years to read her work and hear her talk. Thank you for this.

On Ayaan Hirsi Ali Examines Islam in the 21st Century

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