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Comments by hmarcuse

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Posted on January 24 at 12:46 a.m.

Finally!!! It boils my blood when I see one of those carefree yackers blithely swerving on Goleta and IV streets, never mind the highway.

On Police Cite 74 for Driving While on Cell Phone

Posted on September 17 at 3:31 p.m.

Another cyclist chiming in about drivers who complain about bikes not stopping at stop signs, red lights, etc. Check out what Randy "the ethicist" Cohen says about it in this 4 min. clip:
http://www.streetfilms.org/biking-aro...
The part about the ethics of stopping is at about 3:20 into it, but it comes after a piece about riding the wrong way at 2:55.

Beyond that ethical argument that cyclists only need to stop when they would endanger themselves or others, just ride a bit and you'll see how our infrastructure is designed ONLY for cars--like the timing of sequential lights, or the magnetic triggers that let a traffic light know someone is waiting. The stop signs, lights etc. are almost always utterly unnecessary for slower-moving, non-cocooned 2-ft wide cyclists. We don't kill and maim people, you car drivers do. Massively.

On Cyclists Just Want to Have Fun

Posted on August 11 at 3:23 p.m.

I'm glad to hear he'll be ok. I have to say that our bike paths ought to be better maintained--and designed. Has anyone noticed the horrific "improvements" they've made along El Colegio? They increased the car space to 6, yes SIX, lanes through this residential area, with on street bike paths that are ridiculous because there are long uncoordinated traffic lights every block. But they also NARROWED the existing separate bike path (designated California coastal route!) AND ADDED SHARP CURVES at every driveway. What a way to downgrade a nice bike route and make it unsafe.

On Biker Takes Bad Spill

Posted on March 26 at 10:31 a.m.

I don't see that such a tax would affect consumers much. A vast majority of the oil we use in the US comes from abroad, as well as from other domestic producers (Texas, Alaska, Gulf coast), not California.
And who pays for the clean-up when those oil companies screw up? Taxpayers of course. Let them put their share into the till, instead of into their executives & shareholders' pockets.

On Nava Says No More ‘Free Ride’

Posted on January 24 at 11:45 p.m.

Great article, names most of the major annoyances I as a cyclist & pedestrian experience. I'd add one more: the huge disaster that UCSB did in redesigning El Collegio from Los Carneros into the campus. Not only did they WIDEN the road to 8 lanes (!!) for cars, but they NARROWED and PUT CROSSINGS and SHARP CURVES into the previously straight and crossing-free bike path. Oh they did add a bike lane to the road, but with 4 (I think) long, new, uncoordinated traffic lights, I have never seen a bicyclist using those. What absolute lack of intelligent planning prevailed there! In spite of all those lanes, it's not even car-friendly. Kudos to the car-heads.

On Dead Pedestrians Make Poor Shoppers

Posted on January 4 at 10:03 a.m.

I live near Devereux slough, and in years past after the first rain the sound of "spring peepers" in the low-lying areas would be deafening. This year nothing, zilch, zip. A friend thought she heard a single frog one evening, whereas we used to be inundated by the critters after a rain--on the sidewalks, under flowerpots, in watering cans, everywhere.
It sounds like this fungus is at work here in Goleta as well.

On Amphibians Threatened with Extinction

Posted on November 6 at 10:29 a.m.

In response to that low-taxer, above: One of the consequences of Prop. 13 was that CORPORATE property taxes were locked in at 1970s pre-boom rates (at least until a different corporation takes over--and when does that happen?). That gives such entities a long-lasting tax shelter. And, no surprise here, their contribution to property tax revenues in the state budget has declined precipitously over the years. So it isn't just the little ol' retiree who benefits from Prop 13. We really need to close that corporate tax loophole. And by the way, raising student fees is just another way of taxing those less able to afford it. Taxing the corporations who benefit from the brainpower of the UCs and their alumni would be a much more progressive way.

On UC Campuses Dominate Rankings

Posted on September 7 at 11:16 p.m.

It would be very helpful to have a map accompanying this description--a link to google maps perhaps, or one like this one of the same region:
http://venturacountytrails.org/TrailM...
or
http://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&sourc...

On Little Pine Mountain

Posted on May 21 at 11:43 a.m.

Aside from the issues of relevance and appropriateness of sending that email, which (in contrast to wwsword) I think a faculty committee can well judge, there are questions of due process and outside influence interfering with internal matters of the university. That is where academic freedom comes in.

The normal process in a case of student grievances like this one would have been for the department chair to begin an investigation, which might then have continued to a faculty senate review whether the faculty code of conduct had been violated. That process includes notification of the faculty member concerned at most stages of the process. In this case, that was NOT the course of action.

My understanding is that Prof. Robinson was not informed of any proceedings against him until long after the event itself, and well after those proceedings were implemented--proceedings that did not follow the prescribed course of actions. Additionally, UCSB faculty and administrators met with an outside lobbyist in a closed meeting at which the case was discussed at length. It is unclear to what extent the UCSB process was implemented before that meeting, or accelerated after it. UCSB administrators MUST disclose the timeline so that the university community can see whether due process has been followed.

Beyond that, imagine the chilling effect on instruction if faculty had to worry that the administration might implement secret proceedings against them because agencies outside of the university complained. That would spell the immediate end of UCSB as a world class institution--no clear-thinking faculty or students would want to work at an institution subject to outside censorship.

Harold Marcuse, UCSB Professor of History

On None

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