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Comments by tabatha

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Posted on June 2 at 9:26 p.m.

rc88 - here is something to read and digest and help your understanding of COP.

A comparison of the impacts of natural oil seeps versus oil spills involves much more than determining the volume of oil released. Natural oil seeps in the Santa Barbara Channel introduce substantial volumes of hydrocarbons into the marine environment. Seepage rates may be on the order of 100 barrels of oil per day. Most spills associated with oil production offshore of Santa Barbara County have been small during the years since the catastrophic 1969 Santa Barbara oil spill. The Minerals Management Service estimates that total combined spill volume for the 841 reported spills between 1970 and 1999 was about 830 barrels. However, a comparison of the impacts of seeps and spills based solely on volume would be misleading. The evidence is clear that, far from being invisible against a background of seeps, major spills can have far greater and qualitatively different impacts on the environment than do seeps.

Natural seeps occur extensively in offshore waters along Santa Barbara County’s south coast, and to a lesser extent north of Point Conception. Seep hydrocarbons are released gradually throughout the marine environment, including sea floor, water column, sea surface, and shoreline. Seeps are a potential source of chronic, low-level stress to many organisms, including invertebrates, fish, marine mammals, and birds. Yet, the environment is able to keep pace with the influx of oil at the rate it enters the environment via seeps. Seeps do not result in major mortality of marine animals, nor do they lead to massive accumulations of tar along the shore, though to be sure seeps are responsible for some fatalities of birds and do leave weathered tar residue on rocks in some areas and intermittent tarring of beaches.

Major offshore oil spills are unlikely at any particular place and time, but they do occur regularly in U.S. waters. Spill response is unable to prevent major impacts from large spills. Spills differ from seeps in many ways, but the greatest difference is probably the rate of influx of oil into the environment. Spills release large volumes of oil, usually from a specific location in a short time. The sudden injection of oil into the environment can overwhelm the natural mechanisms for dispersing and degrading the oil, so that large amounts are deposited on shore, many animals are killed, and sensitive habitats are impacted, sometimes with long-term consequences. Hence, impacts on the environment from a spill are not simply an incremental addition to the impacts of natural seeps, but can be far more destructive.

http://www.sbcountyplanning.org/energ...

On Do Something Now

Posted on June 2 at 5:14 p.m.

Industry should be encouraged to find other source materials if possible than oil. Any reduction of the use of oil is good for everyone.

It is heartening to read that there are people who are being very proactive in this field, and for those who spend many hours working and have the time, the entrepreneurs are the solution.

"Forget legalizing pot: Two of the most powerful Republicans in the Senate believe there’s a much stronger chance to legalize growing hemp in the U.S., opening up an entirely new market for crops, health food, oil, shirts, towels and even dog toys.
Kentucky’s Mitch McConnell, Rand Paul and Rep. Thomas Massie are pushing legislation in both chambers of Congress that would remove the less-potent member of the cannabis family from the federal list of controlled substances, allowing its return to America’s farmland after more than 40 years."

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2015/02...

For once I agree with McConnell, but Republicans are so business-orientated that it makes sense for them to support this.

Plastics can be made from hemp. Cleaner than oil.

To do more, be aware of people that are pursuing oil alternatives, and support them.

South America has embraced solar even more than the US., as has Australia.

"Australian households are world leaders in solar power installation, according to new figures from Australia's peak industry body representing the fossil fuel and renewable energy sector.

The Energy Supply Association of Australia, representing the fossil fuel and renewable energy sector, has sourced data from around the world revealing household solar photovoltaic (PV) penetration in Australia is way out in front of any other nation.

The report shows almost 15 per cent of Australian households have adopted the technology to power their homes."

On Do Something Now

Posted on June 2 at 5 p.m.

Part of a statement by Capps:

"Secretary Moniz, I appreciate the President's and your strong commitment to pursuing renewable energy.

The objectives of the QER are important. We cannot build a clean energy future without preparing for new challenges and modernizing our infrastructure.

But we must also do everything in our power to ensure that this infrastructure is as safe as possible.

Congress has repeatedly directed PHMSA to strengthen its standards, yet PHMSA has done little.

The QER specifically mentions a draft PHMSA rule in development that would help strengthen some of these standards, but PHMSA first began taking comment on this rule nearly 5 years ago and nothing has been published.

And in 2011, Congress enacted legislation explicitly directing PHMSA to issue a rule requiring automatic shutoff valves on new pipelines by January of last year.

Still not even a proposal, let alone a final rule. This is inexcusable.

I know DOE does not have direct control over this agency or rulemaking, but what's the point in replacing aging pipelines and building new ones if they're built using ineffective and outdated safety standards?

The pipeline that burst in my district was not even 30 years old; age clearly is not the only factor here.t that Plains and other companies have oil spill contingency funds shows that there is no such thing as a safe pipeline.""

Repeat:
Congress has repeatedly directed PHMSA to strengthen its standards, yet PHMSA has done little.

The QER specifically mentions a draft PHMSA rule in development that would help strengthen some of these standards, but PHMSA first began taking comment on this rule nearly 5 years ago and nothing has been published.

The repeated finger-pointing at Capps has now been discredited.

http://www.edhat.com/site/tidbit.cfm?...

On The Mysterious Case of the Automatic Shutoff Valve

Posted on June 1 at 11:03 a.m.

tawnyfawn - much of the disruption in the world's weather, is the direct consequence of oil use.

swimmer - I think most people recognize that oil will not disappear overnight. What the demonstrations are about is for there to be more effort to change to renewable energy faster. Demonstrations are very important, because they are an indication of public sentiment. Some of us, have cut down on oil use a great deal.

One of the things that would help with oil's ubiquitous use, is the acceptance of hemp for manufacturing in the US. Just because so many products use oil is not the fault of the consumer - they did not make the decision to use oil to make so many plastic products. If they need to buy something, their choice is limited to what is in the store. So you are putting the cart before the horse.

Those who demonstrate would LOVE to see far less oil used in products. That is why they demonstrate.

On The Mysterious Case of the Automatic Shutoff Valve

Posted on June 1 at 10:51 a.m.

What does having a hard life have to do with keeping treaties? I never mentioned it. NomoreSanity, you are quite welcome to critique what I have written - just as I do you. But to predict what I will do is a dishonest, lying and unethical tactic.

My original post said, in summary: The fighting by the Indians is not the point and should not be mentioned. What was the most salient point was the cheating and lying and cultural annihilation. I did not see the culture of whites being annihilated. Here is my sentence, stressing what was "of import".

"No, the matter of import here, is the lying and cheating and breaking of 400 treaties by the colonizers. Which they did in other parts of the world as well, but in not as many numbers. And their attempts to remove the "Indian" from the Indian - in other words, cultural genocide.:"

If 400 treaties were not broken, the shape of the country with respect to land ownership would be very different. That has nothing to do with how tough it was for anyone. The colonizers made the choice - they had the freedom to change course at any time. Not so, the original inhabitants.

And this happened throughout the world, where colonization took place. And yes, colonization impacted indigenous people, and much of that impact cannot be reversed. However, it should be recognized for what it is.

This conversation has been extended with no meaning, because the original points in my original comment were completely ignored, and I have had to reiterate what those points were. Reading comprehension? Not.

On Native American Protest

Posted on May 31 at 10:03 p.m.

You also seem to have comprehension problems. There were far more than six nations of Indians in the US - there were far more by a great number. Thus I never said or even implied that "mostly peaceful cultures were wiped out". In fact, re-read what I wrote and note the following:

"Indians to be defeated because they warred among themselves "

"when humans all over the world were embroiled in similar conflicts."

On Native American Protest

Posted on May 31 at 9:33 p.m.

I guess there is a lack of knowledge about the native Indian Six Nations, who came together to form a peaceful alliance.

"The people of the Six Nations, also known by the French term, Iroquois [1] Confederacy, call themselves the Hau de no sau nee (ho dee noe sho nee) meaning People Building a Long House. Located in the northeastern region of North America, originally the Six Nations was five and included the Mohawks, Oneidas, Onondagas, Cayugas, and Senecas. The sixth nation, the Tuscaroras, migrated into Iroquois country in the early eighteenth century. Together these peoples comprise the oldest living participatory democracy on earth. Their story, and governance truly based on the consent of the governed, contains a great deal of life-promoting intelligence for those of us not familiar with this area of American history. The original United States representative democracy, fashioned by such central authors as Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson, drew much inspiration from this confederacy of nations. In our present day, we can benefit immensely, in our quest to establish anew a government truly dedicated to all life's liberty and happiness much as has been practiced by the Six Nations for over 800 hundred years. [2] "

Implying that it was OK for the Indians to be defeated because they warred among themselves is really despicable logic, when the Europeans were doing the same thing among themselves. They also exported their war-like tendencies to the countries they colonized. Their human rights records were also not very good toward even their own people, if one reads about the "convicts" that were shipped to Australia. And of course, the Indians never had the equivalence of WWI and WWII.

It really is a lame excuse to bring up those conflicts, when humans all over the world were embroiled in similar conflicts.

No, the matter of import here, is the lying and cheating and breaking of 400 treaties by the colonizers. Which they did in other parts of the world as well, but in not as many numbers. And their attempts to remove the "Indian" from the Indian - in other words, cultural genocide.

On Native American Protest

Posted on May 30 at 4:30 p.m.

"Wow, someone has co-opted nattyg's moniker and posted a common sense response, for once. "
Common sense was only useful for bashing Obama. What did BP get away with? They are paying big time, I believe.

Really off topic, but Obama did not give the go ahead for Keystone, so I guess it is not too far off topic, since it is Canadian oil.

"TAR SANDS CRUDE SET TO FLOW THROUGH TORONTO
Enbridge to begin shipping Alberta bitumen through its Line 9 pipeline as soon as next week despite the company's refusal to install safety shutoffs at water crossings and a First Nations lawsuit"

Enbridge expects to begin shipping the Albertan crude through the pipe any time now notwithstanding Toronto City Council passed a motion http://app.toronto.ca/tmmis/viewAgend... last month calling on the company to install emergency shut off valves on either side of water-crossings in the city. (Enbridge has refused to do so.) The company is also being taken to court by the Chippewas of the Thames for its failure to consult some 18 First Nations communities along the pipeline route.

At National Energy Board hearings into the project, environmental activists raised the spectre of a possible repeat of the eco-disaster caused by the rupture of Enbridge's Line 6B in Kalamazoo, Michigan, in 2010.

https://nowtoronto.com/news/think-fre...

How much more expensive can shut-off valves be versus clean up of water-crossings. What is the reasoning process used by oil companies?

On The Mysterious Case of the Automatic Shutoff Valve

Posted on May 29 at 7:41 p.m.

The more effort that is made everywhere to limit emissions the better. The mantra that because China is not, is not an excuse. China, btw, is spending more money than any other country on renewable energy. And much of their fossil fuel based power is to sate this country's appetite for their cheap goods.

Here are two things we can do - limit emissions - stop the importing (ships use fuel as well) of Chinese goods by buying less.

It is not who is doing what - but we should all do as much as possible so that our nest does not go up in smoke. Our rainless west coast is getting drier by the day.

On County Adopts Stringent New Emissions Limits

Posted on May 27 at 11:42 p.m.

Well written piece. I feel how you felt. I hope you cleaned up well afterward. Thankfully, no dispersants had been used, lessening the pollution you subjected yourself to. I hope the pelican survived.

On On the Beach

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