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Jackson Scott

Melbourne


The latest buzz artist to make the rounds on Pitchfork, Jackson Scott just released his fuzz-filled debut LP called Melbourne. He gained notoriety after “That Awful Sound” was featured on the site as a Best New Track and was subsequently signed to the Fat Possum Records label. The song, which appears mid-album, previewed coming attractions with gurgling effects befitting a spaced-out B-movie. What we end up with is an album rife with experimentation. “Never Ever” creates an undercurrent of audio filled with stray chords and wisps of whispers, all layered beneath the varnish of a grungy guitar. It’s a controlled kind of chaos that abruptly cuts into what sounds like a fast-forwarded cassette tape, a nod to decades past. All this comes complete with Scott’s nasally vocals, which sound a whole lot like an angsty child … in a good, punk rock kind of way. All in all, it’s a pretty impressive first effort for a 20-year-old who’s still self-recording all his material on a four-track.

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