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Author Kris Waldherr Launches her new Novel entitled Lost History of Dreams

DATE & TIME

Mon, Jun 10 7:00 PM

ADDRESS (map)

3321 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105

VENUE (website)

Chaucer's Books

Please join us at Chaucer’s books as we welcome Kris Waldherr, award-winning author, illustrator, and designer,  as she launches her novel entitled, Lost History of Dreams, an eerie, ghostly, and poetic love story.

“When famed Byronesque poet Hugh de Bonne is discovered dead of a heart attack in his bath one morning, his cousin Robert Highstead, a historian turned post-mortem photographer, is charged with a simple task: transport Hugh’s remains for burial in a chapel. This chapel, a stained glass folly set on the moors of Shropshire, was built by de Bonne sixteen years earlier to house the remains of his beloved wife and muse, Ada. Since then, the chapel has been locked and abandoned, a pilgrimage site for the rabid fans of de Bonne’s last book, The Lost History of Dreams. However, Ada’s grief-stricken niece refuses to open the glass chapel for Robert unless he agrees to her bargain: before he can lay Hugh to rest, Robert must record Isabelle’s story of Ada and Hugh’s ill-fated marriage over the course of five nights. As the mystery of Ada and Hugh’s relationship unfolds, so does the secret behind Robert’s own marriage–including that of his fragile wife, Sida, who has not been the same since the tragic accident three years ago, and the origins of his own morbid profession that has him seeing things he shouldn’t–things from beyond the grave”–

Since The Lost History of Dreams concerns the mystery surrounding a poet, it’s only to be expected that the details—of events, people, emotions—should all contain dreamy, often surreal, and extremely descriptive phrasing. Whether Robert’s or Isabelle’s, the narrative is exactly that. The words flow in an endless stream, beautiful and lyrical.”  — New York Journal of Books

“…while most gothic tales offer only darkness and tragedy, a surprising amount of light and joy imbues the ending here. Fitting, perhaps, for a novel that uses stained glass as a symbol for heavenly possibility, even in the face of death… Waldherr writes that ‘love stories are ghost stories in disguise.’ This one, happily, succeeds as both.” — Kirkus Reviews

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