What We Don’t Know

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Despite some scary days, March 30 was day 18 since I came down with symptoms and my doc had me quarantine. With only 1,700 tests in S.B. county at the time and those in Tier 1 exceeding that number of tests, I was not tested as I was Tier 3. Today, though a bit fatigued, I went back to work (architects are considered essential) staying 10-15 feet from others and wearing an N95 mask. My projects were all wanting my input. I had energy to visit two. Oddly enough, a contractor I’m working with had what I had, only worse, six or seven weeks ago. Perhaps he is who I caught it from. We’ll never know.

At the time he came down with it (mid-February), there was zero coronavirus testing in the U.S. The Santa Barbara doctors didn’t know what he had; he required hospitalization and a breathing tubing was inserted into his lungs to facilitate breathing, thru very thick phlegm. He still suffers from 90 percent hearing loss in one ear and fatigue.

Like me, he had:
* Very thick phlegm
* Sore throat
* Dry cough
* Headache
* Intense lower back pain.
* Incredible chest tightness/pressure
* Couldn’t sleep on his back due to breathing issues
* Fatigue

Additionally, he had:
* no taste
* no smell
* 102 fever for three days

Both of us would love to know if we had COVID-19, but now that we are better, they will not test us. Again, not enough tests. If we knew we had coronavirus, we both would gladly give blood so that perhaps our antibodies could help someone else. Sadly, we may never know if we had the, and it will be too late for others. And suffice to say, the numbers are seriously skewed on the low side of those infected.

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